Home Forums Saxophone Reeds Reed confusion

This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Carl Robinson Carl Robinson 1 month ago.

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  • #52208
    Profile photo of Carl Robinson
    Carl Robinson
    Participant

    I’ve been using the same reed now for three weeks, daily practise etc. The Reed seems to be getting better the more I play it, is this normal?. Because as a guitarist the moment you start to play a new set of strings they start to degrade, I thought that would be the same for Reeds. I’m using Vandoren Blue 1.5. Another thing is they seem to “warm up” a bit like a Marshall valve amp lol. I really am enjoying learning the Saxophone–so many new discoveries. I’m not even going to ask anything about mouthpieces, not remotely educated enough to open that can of Worms lol.

    #52242
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    reeds – that’s a can of worms. usually they take a few minutes to warm up, unless you play synthetic reeds.

    #52251
    saxjohnny
    saxjohnny
    Keymaster

    Carl, since you’re new to it just keep on your current mp at least for a few months.
    meanwhile you’ll be learning how reeds work, then you can better decide on your mp.
    yes, a cane reed will get better day by day…stay good for a while longer, then die out
    you’ll feel it dying because it felt so perfect for that little time in between.
    how long? they’re all different and it also depends on how much playing you do so
    a good cane reed can last several week to several months.

    #52294
    Profile photo of Carl Robinson
    Carl Robinson
    Participant

    Would a symptom of a cane “Dying” be difficulty in hitting high register notes? because shortly before changing the reed Vandoren 1.5 I found it harder to hit A etc with Octave key. I put it down to me.

    #52305
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    One of the best things to do is take your sax into a repair shop, to check for leaks.
    I recently had problems with high notes, and that was down to the little pad on the neck not sealing properly.
    Another problem with reeds, is how they are positioned on the mouthpiece, miss-allign them and they don’t play properly in the full range of notes. What i do is slap a reed on the mouthpiece, and just play a complete scale of notes on the mouthpiece against a tuner, more often than not, i have to re-position the reed a tiny fraction on the mouthpiece, to get all the notes playing properly. Once i’ve done that i’m good to go and then i connect the mouthpiece to the sax. Otherwise, in my case, it’s just pot luck, sticking the reed on the mouthpiece. (call it fine tuning if you like)

    #52313
    brother cavefish
    brother cavefish
    Participant

    i have a sax light i use if there is a leak you will see it

    #52324
    saxjohnny
    saxjohnny
    Keymaster

    yes, even the slightest pad leak can make it difficult to play.
    also, a reed that’s on it’s last legs can do the same!
    with experience we can tell which is which that’s why
    making sure you have no leaks is a must.
    when it’s the reeds fault you will notice other things other than that one note though.

    #53220
    Profile photo of Carl Robinson
    Carl Robinson
    Participant

    Man I tell you Guitarists have it soooo easy with strings lol. Just been playing, using a 1.5 Vandoren Blue, I sounded like a farting Frog!! checked the Reed, looks great, still sound chronic, take reed off, put back in exactly same place–perfect!!! these things have a mind of their own. If Guitarists had to put up with this they’d be having hissy fits every ten minutes.

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